Cover for The Brahan Seer

BrahanSeerCover-reduced

The cover for what we are calling my sixth* novel “The Brahan Seer” has just been released. This is a historical literary novel (with supernatural overtones) which will be published in paperback by Acair Books next month. (*The numbering of novels is always a bit of a dilemma for me. Although this book took me seven years to write, its acceptance for publication occured after Entanglement and before Volwys -my seventh book, which will also be published this summer, by Dog Horn). The Brahan Seer is the story of Scotland’s Nostradamus, a semi-legendary figure called Coinneach Odhar whose name and prophecies are still very much alive in the Gaelic-speaking areas of Highland Scotland. Some people say he never existed, others that the folk tales about him are an amalgam of various seer figures from previous centuries. The second sight was once very widespread and accepted in Gaelic Scotland, not the out-and-out crankery we are brought up to regard it as today. All I can say is that if you read his predictions (many of which describe the world we are living in now), or gather an overview of them through my book, then you too will begin to question whether our current understanding of time is quite as safe and scientifically sound as we think it is. Curiously enough, support for this view comes from the unexpected direction of Quantum Mechanics/Particle Physics, which currently also suggests that time may be a human illusion not shared by the rest of the (non-animate) matter of the universe. I’ve been very lucky over the years to get some superb covers for my books by some great artists and designers. Even within that context, I am particularly blown away by this one. This cover is by Jade Starmore, a graduate of Glasgow School of Art, with book design and layout by Graham Starmore. Once seen, this haunting image of the eye, the window and the birds, is unforgettable. Let’s hope that the text can live up to it!

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